Saturday, April 19, 2014

Penelope


Never a big Natalie Wood fan myself but she was at her peak in popularity in '66 and PENELOPE was a fun vehicle for her.











Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Chase and Sanborn 102nd Anniversary Radio Special


In November of 1966, coffee maker Chase and Sanborn whose classic radio series had for a time headlined Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy in the 1930s and 1940s, returned the venerable ventriloquist act to the air for this one-off radio special celebrating NBC and, for all intents and purposes, radio itself. Although dramatic network radio is considered to have officially died only in 1962 with the final episodes of SUSPENSE and YOURS TRULY, JOHNNY DOLLAR, this special a mere 4 years later is sometimes credited with igniting the OTR nostalgia boom that followed for the next decade or so.

Friday, April 11, 2014

Marvel Super-Heroes Rings


These are just some of the nifty sights to see at the recently revived DIAL B FOR BLOG which is currently featuring a long and soon to be groundbreaking look at Steve Ditko's Spider-man which ended in '66.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Mondo Topless


Over the years, Russ Meyer made large-busted women practically film genre unto itself. In 1966, he came out with MONDO TOPLESS, one of many "Mondo"movies around that time, all of which were somewhat exploitative documentaries. Meyer would go on, of course, to even bigger and better things (pun intended).





Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Andy Williams-Softly As I Leave You




One of the most beautiful melodies of all time, here's the great Andy Williams at his peak in '66 presenting "Softly As I Leave You." So beautiful it hurts.

Monday, March 31, 2014

Blow-Up


Although often remembered as a film from 1967, BLOW-UP was actually made and released in '66. Produced by Carlo Ponti and directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, BLOW-UP has a distinct European flair and its then-controversial use of adult language and nudity make it a cinematic groundbreaker.


Added to that, though, is the fact that it's a genuinely good movie, an artsy Hitcockian variation about a fashion photographer convinced that he accidentally photographed a murder.


Star David Hemmings was THE hot young thing for a while after this film and distinguished himself in a wide range of roles in many films.



His eyebrows did NOT age well, however. 


The picture, set in swinging London, is also remembered as the only movie appearance of the Yardbirds--in their short-lived edition featuring both Jeff Beck AND Jimmy Page. The director had apparently wanted the Who, then made overtures to the Velvet Underground, and settled for the Yardbirds...but still had them destroy their instruments onstage like the Who.