Tuesday, February 26, 2013

The Magic Serpent



FROM IMDB: In ancient Japan, a good lord is killed and his throne is taken by the trecherous Yuki Daijo and his wizard friend Oroki-maru. The young prince Ikazuki-maru is rescued from the jaws of death by a magic bird sent by a wizard. Ten years later, Ikazuki-maru embarks on an adventure to avenge his parents and the wizard's death with his magic powers he learned from the wizard. He kills Yuki Daijo but then must battle Oroki-maru in a battle to the death. Written by Horror-Fan









Sunday, February 24, 2013

UK Popeye and Beetle Bailey


King Features characters such as BEETLE BAILEY and POPEYE were popular enough in the UK in '66 that they produced their own homegrown versions as seen here from that year's TV COMIC ANNUAL.










Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Jaguar Bond


Steve Banes has posted two obscure examples of an adult comic strip published, apparently for several years, in the Men's magazine, JAGUAR. There's two, one from '66 and one from '69. The latter is standard stuff for this type of strip which all men's mags seemed to have in those days. The former, however, is genuinely funny and amazingly well-drawn! In the comments, Mike Howlett, who knows these things,  identifies the top strip, from the January '66 issue, as being by the great comic book artist Bob Powell. 

Adults Only!




Monday, February 18, 2013

Georgy Girl


Following in the tradition of her father Michael and her sister Vanessa, Lynn Redgrave made her first bug international smash with this '66 movie, helped along splendidly by the hit theme song as recorded by The Seekers. It was probably my favorite song that year and I never even saw the movie until it hit television a few years later!












 

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Friday, February 8, 2013

Disney's Pooh



Long a favorite literary character for children, Winnie the Pooh made his big-screen debut from Disney in '66, voiced by Sterling Holloway in WINNIE THE POOH AND THE HONEY TREE.

Friday, February 1, 2013

Neal Adams and Ben Casey


BEN CASEY had been a popular TV medical drama for several years and the accompanying newspaper comic strip was drawn by a young artist named Neal Adams in an ultra-realistic style. In '66, BEN CASEY ended both its TV and comics page runs, freeing up Adams to seek work at DC and subsequently revolutionize comics art in the late sixties.